Jon Anderson

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    I was introduced printmaking the easy way:  I had a friend who owned a screenprinting shop and I was lucky enough to learn the basics just by observing him work and asking questions about his methods for making text and images singing print.  

    I was in school at the time in the US with plans to become a cardio-thoracic surgeon. In the second year of my associates degree I found I had an aptitude for psychology: particularly in the field of sensation and perception.  I found the principles of Gestalt psychology shaping my own perceptions: How pixels and fields of light and dark, even in pure colors, could show gradients and shades:  How grouping of similar and contrasting colours could influence a person’s perception to see things that, without proper context, would not be there.  It felt like magic, like alchemy to me.

    In the next few years I supported myself through school with my own screenprinting company. I was printing bootleg t-shirts, creating logotypes for clients and falling in love with vector artwork. I was surprised at how I could support myself doing something that was a pure pleasure. I worked as a designer, typesetter, copy editor and sign maker.  I hand-lettered neon signs with a can of paint and a lettering brush thirty feet in the air, and I loved it all.

    A common theme through my artwork is the halftone.  I’ve always been struck with the way a matrix of shapes contrasting light and dark could bring a static image to vibrate before me.   My artwork is not oriented to a certain direction of thinking or interpretation - it is context sensitive. I find that in a world where images are increasingly used as absolute statements to consume goods and purchase things, my motivation is to create images that impact a person by raising questions about one’s own experience in life between the light and the dark.

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